Build and transform abstract structures using 6 commands

Design algorithms and watch them getting coded in 6 languages

  • 6 commands (no unnecessary complexity!)
  • Cycle counts such as 6N²−6N (fewer arbitrary numbers!)
  • Scores as high as 600i (unreal solutions count!)
  • 6+ programming languages (no coding needed!)
  • 60 levels and 30 achievements (plus hint levels that you won't need!)

* Symbolic cycle counts availability vary by level and solution

In the demo: 16 levels, 8 achievements and 2 programming languages.
In the extended demo: 22 levels, 9 achievements and 3 programming languages.
In the further-extended demo: 33 levels, 15 achievements and 4 programming languages.
In the greatly-extended demo: 43 levels, 19 achievements and 4 programming languages.
In the hugely-extended demo: 46 levels, 25 achievements and 6 programming languages.

In the incredibly-extended demo: 55 levels, 27 achievements and 6 programming languages.

The game is in active development.


Top players:

Selected changes:
v0.8—v0.9: <many changes>
v0.9.1: new level, global histograms in Level Select
v0.9.2: new levels, secondary mouse button in Settings
v0.9.3: new levels and achievements
v0.9.4: new levels and achievements, enhanced leaderboard, more accessible root
v0.9.4.3: bug fix: Leaderboard button replacing game with website (introduced in v0.9.4.2)
v0.9.5: new levels, achievements and programming languages
v0.9.5.4: bug fix: inadvertent File Upload popups for some players (mostly since v0.9.4.2)
v0.9.6: new levels and achievements, Save/Load in private browsing mode
v0.9.7: new levels and achievements, symmetric scoring range (target±120), enhanced Welcome

Comments

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this is pretty neat! I can't believe you could have implemented a graph isomorphism algorithm without it getting pretty nasty though, so props for that!

Thank you!

The isomorphism algorithm started simple enough when I only needed to ensure that it wouldn't get exponential over the specific outputs of the levels. But once I introduced infinite loop detection that compares arbitrary execution states, it became much more involved. It was pretty fun to implement, actually!